Aquatic Ecosystems

Aquatic Ecosystems

ALGAE

Horizontal distribution of algae (modelled). The contour units are mg/l, and the vector scale is in m/s.

 

Dominant marine ecosystems existing along our Caribbean coastlines are made up primarily of mangroves, seagrass and coral reef, as well as salt marshes, intertidal zones, estuaries and lagoons. These systems act as natural filters of land-based nutrients, buffer storm effects and provide nurseries for marine life. They are also sensitive to extreme water quality changes. Much of our food source is marine-based, especially for island states that depend heavily on rich, productive fishing inshore areas and offshore banks. Overfishing has therefore become a serious pressure faced by these systems. Populated coastal regions are also being developed for tourism, land reclamation, port industries, energy production and shoreline hard engineering measures coastal rehabilitation. Much of this development, if unchecked, contributes directly to long-term imbalance of water quality and will adversely affect marine ecosystems in the long run. These sensitive ecosystems are also prone to hazards such sea-level and sea temperature rise. It becomes crucial to understand the underlying hydrodynamics in order better predict how changing water quality and sea levels will impact coastal habitats and ecosystems. The regions of focus are Kingston Harbour, Portland Bight, the Port Royal Cays and Montego Bay.

 

ORG_N-compressor

Horizontal distribution of organic nitrogen (modelled). The contour units are mg/l, and the vector scale is in m/s.

 

ORGANIC PHOSPHORUS

Horizontal distribution of organic phosphorous (modelled). The contour units are mg/l, and the vector scale is in m/s.

 


Navigtion